Where Agile is Being

Preface

Here I discuss some of my thoughts on the Agile Industry in general and suggest that it is not necessarily innovating, but rather Agile has gotten stuck. I will suggest that this is largely due to the overt focus on doing agile whilst not paying enough attention to being agile. Finally, we will see that Agnostic Agile helps to bridge this gap through its twelve principles and its ongoing publication of content.

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An Agnostic Agile case in Infrastructure and Service Management

By Adrian Lander

The context was outsourcing, this time. While I was a “software product guy” by origin (in SW development since the age of 10, mid 70s – not the hobby computer stuff but real HP computers), my turnaround record led to me being suggested for challenging misery from time to time. Not always in a position to duck… In the end, it turned out to be an interesting application of lean agile  in unusual territory.

CASE – A GLOBAL RESOURCES COMPANY

80+ critical business application servers. Moved from client data center to outsourcer’s data center as part of a very large global outsourcing deal. None of the servers had been accepted by the data center as they were not meeting data center standards. In production – full use by the client who ran their business critical processes with it. The outsourcing program was an IT transition and transformation, and the fact that none of the servers had been accepted was blocking new projects, within a large program. So, blocking business improvement and money coming in for both parties.  Of course there was more going on than getting 80+ services already in productive use for years, accepted by a center.

Sounds simple to fix. Reality was totally different due to constraints. SLAs the client was paying for – but not end to end executed, as should be obvious. Due to the global 24×7 use of the systems, maintenance windows were short and rare and hard to obtain. Then for the specific data center, that also housed defense systems, security clearance was needed and any visitor needed to be announced in advance. All servers needed 5 types of upgrade, requiring 5 different specialist engineers.

The previous project manager had not made progress, as when one of the engineers turned out not to be available, more than one window was needed. (He was getting replaced or relieved from the misery)

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Is Agile not simply the use of common sense?

By Karin Schijf

My goal as an Agile coach is to really help the client. To make sure we move along in an Agile way with the ever-faster and ever-changing circumstances. For example, to stay ahead of your competitors, to improve quality, and to adjust and modernise certain ways of working. With improved business results as the outcome of the process.
I have noticed that certain organisations have turned Agile into somewhat of a goal, rather than a tool. Organisations that boast about their high Agile maturity are not necessarily the frontrunners in their industry or field. Common sense remains important in order to obtain results. Is the way we work today still logical, considering everything we know now that we didn’t know yesterday?

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